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Moving an Elderly Parent Into Your Home

March 14, 2013

Having a power chair can help with parent's independenceWhen you decide the time is right for moving an elderly parent into your home – because of failing health, financial concerns, or simply to ensure your aging parent’s safety and comfort – you will be making a life-changing choice that will impact the entire family.

For your parent, this may mean leaving familiar surroundings to embrace a new way of living. You, your spouse and/or your children will also have to make a wide range of adjustments, all of which start the very moment your elderly parent moves in.

In advance of moving an aging parent, it is important to consider your readiness for the changes to come. Though your intentions are to do what you believe is best for your mother or father, there will be lots of preparations to make and several questions to answer, before moving an elderly parent into your home.

Day-to-Day Living Arrangements

  • Is there enough room for individual privacy, such as an extra bedroom or a separate bathroom?
  • Can you easily adapt meal plans, family schedules and day-to-day household routines?
  • If your home has indoor stairs, will you be able to have a stair lift installed for added safety?

Independent Mobility Factors

  • Does your parent require assistance to get around in the home?
  • If your parent uses a wheelchair or power chair for personal mobility, is your home accessible?
  • What type of home modifications may be required? (i.e, portable and/or self-supporting wheelchair ramps? changes to the bathroom and/or kitchen?)

An Elderly Parent's Medical/Social/Emotional Needs

  • Who will care for your parent while you are at work? 
  • Will you hire in-home assistance, a professional caregiver or a geriatric companion?
  • What arrangements must you make for maintaining your parent's health, keeping medical 
  • appointments or for participating in necessary social and leisure activities?

These are just some examples of the questions and issues you will be facing when your elderly parent moves in. The better prepared you are for this life transition, the more likely it will succeed.

This list of helpful senior care information may provide family caregivers with support and additional senior care information.

 

This article is for general information and education purposes only.

Related Articles

  1. How to Care for Aging Parents Who Live Independently
  2. Physical Signs of Senior Mobility Loss
  3. How to Communicate and Care for Elderly Parents
  4. Help for Caregivers: Talking to your Parent's Doctor