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7 Summer Memories Your Grandkids Won’t Know About

August 10, 2015

7-summer-memories-your-grandkids-wont-know-about

Summer is a time for creating memories and reminiscing about the past. But for the new generation of kids, there are plenty of memories you have that they won’t even know about. How many of these do you remember?

1. Using — and folding — maps

Picture this: It is summer. You’re happy that school is out, and it’s time for a road trip! But, inevitably, it’s time to pull over and check that map to make sure you’re going the right way. There’s a certain amount of quibbling over where you are and which direction is best before it’s time to pull back out onto the road — and then there’s the matter of folding the map back up correctly to fit it back in the glove box. This summer rite-of-passage has been made obsolete by GPS units and smartphones.

2. Rolling down car windows — by hand

Sure, if you were lucky enough to be in a family with a luxury car, you knew about power windows. But for most of us, being a kid in a car on a hot summer day meant you had to position yourself forward a little to roll down that window down by hand as quickly as possible. When’s the last time you saw a car with (or even used) that nostalgic hand crank?

3. The way, way back in station wagons

Did your family or a friend’s family have a station wagon? At a certain age, there was nothing cooler than sitting in the way, way back of the wagon and facing the traffic. With today’s safety regulations, every child is in a car seat, booster seat or belted in a seat belt. Sitting in the back of the third row of the family SUV just isn’t the same as sitting in the way, way back of the station wagon was back in the day.

4. Rotary phones

It takes just as long to dial an entire phone number on a smartphone today than it did to dial “0” on a rotary phone a few decades ago! Chances are your grandkids won’t see rotary phones except in old movies. And, they may not even realize that’s why we coined the term “hanging up” on someone — as opposed to “ending” the call — when they call their friends to play. That is if they call a friend instead of just texting them....

5. When there really is nothing on TV

With only three (or maybe even five) channels on the television, there was definitely truth to the statement, “There’s nothing on TV.” It’s hard to believe but there wasn’t 24/7 programming not so many years ago — let alone hundreds of channels to choose from. Summer isn’t about watching TV, but sometimes it’s nice to remember when times were simpler.

6. Card catalogues

Rainy days mean indoor activities — like heading to the library. Remember looking up books in the library card catalogue? Kids today can actually still use the Dewey Decimal System to find books in the library — except chances are they will be searching for the books on a computer instead of the card catalogue. And that’s if they’re actually physically in the library and not checking out e-books or buying books to read on their e-reader.

7. Street lights as clocks

“Be home when the street lights come on!” You didn’t need a watch or a clock; all you had to do was keep an eye on the sun and you’d be able to tell when your outside play time was winding down. You’d squeeze every last second you could out of that sunset, before the sun finally dipped past the horizon and the sensors on the neighborhood street lights went into action.

Keep making memories with Hoveround

Just because you have mobility issues doesn’t mean you have to stop making new memories with your grandkids! Take back your life and keep cheering them on at baseball games, taking them camping and vacationing to fun places like amusement parks. Call Hoveround and talk to our mobility specialists today at (800) 542-7236 to find out how we can take you where you want to go!

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